All posts by FISH FINDER

How to fish the Gippsland Lakes, Victoria

Lakes Entrance weather and tides
Lakes Entrance coastline on Beachsafe
Gippsland Lakes artificial reefs
VIC fishing regulations
VIC marine parks
Return to the VIC fishing map

The Gippsland Lakes are a large area of interconnected tidal waterways served by a maintained sea entrance.

The lakes are in East Gippsland, covering an area of about 350sqkm between the towns of Lakes Entrance, Bairnsdale and Sale.

The largest waterways are Lake Wellington, Lake King and Lake Victoria. These are fed by the Avon, Thomson, Latrobe, Mitchell, Nicholson and Tambo Rivers, and drain into the Bass Strait through a sea entrance 2km southwest of Lakes Entrance CBD.

To the east is the separate Lake Tyers, a small tidal waterway often closed to Bass Strait, but sometimes opened by heavy rain or weather.

Though much smaller than the above-mentioned waterways, Lake Tyers is mostly navigable by recreational vessels.

This Gippsland Lakes region offers a bit of everything, including surf, estuary, offshore and freshwater fishing.

The sea opening is not safe for trailer boats, but the lakes themselves produce plenty of fish for anglers fishing from dinghies or yaks.

Landbased anglers can try the following fishing spots …

*Eastern Beach off Eastern Beach Rd for salmon, tailor and mullet;
*Kalimna Jetty for bream, luderick, flathead, tailor and salmon;
*Kalimna Wall for luderick and bream;
*Nungurner Jetty and the north side of Reeve Channel;
*Fishermen’s Wharf at Paynesville;
*Crane Jetty at Shaving Point (mulloway);
*Raymond Island Jetty; (bream and flathead)
*Montague Point (bream and big flathead);
*Point Harrington spit (flathead and flounder);
*Resides Jetty north of Point Scott.

Being relatively clear, with little tidal run in some areas, and receiving steady fishing pressure, the best results are had in the lakes using the lightest tackle and fresh local or live bait.

The main species caught are bream, luderick, leatherjackets, garfish, whiting, salmon, silver trevally, tailor and flathead are abundant in the lower lakes, with bream and estuary perch upstream.

Using lures is a way to avoid some of the juvenile bream.

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Gippsland Lakes Artificial Reefs

Artificial reefs have been installed in the lakes and these host a range of species.

As much of the lake floor is sand fish are attracted to the reef structures.

Find a reef and anchor or drift over with baits or jigs.

You can expect much the same species as are found throughout the lakes.

The various reefs are as shown below, for the latest news on new reefs keep an eye on the Victoria Fisheries Authority web pages.

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The Tambo River has good bream, with bankside fishing spots.

Access to the Tambo is below the Princes Hwy Bridge via the Metung Rd and above the bridge via the Upper Tambo Rd.

Downstream access is via McFarlanes Rd. Launch boats at the Johnsonville ramp.

The river mouth into the lake is a great place for big bream, especially after rain.

Marshalls Flat on the west bank is a popular landbased area, as is Rough Rd, off Metung Rd.

The upper river fishes best in dry weather. Mulloway are caught.

The Nicholson River has little landbased access, but the small area called The Pear Tree, on the west bank about 1.5km below the Princes Hwy bridge, is a good spot.

A boat ramp is near the highway.

Bream, luderick and flathead are throughout the river.

The Mitchell River has a boat ramp at Eagle Point gives access to good spots such as The Cut, where the river flows into Jones Bay. Bream, estuary perch, flathead, mullet and garfish are caught.

Landbased fishing is at East Riverbank Rd and at the jetty next to the Lucknow Bridge.

The upper river’s snags fish best in summer.

Lake King fishes best after rain, which forces fish out of the rivers.

Eagle Point Bay is good after rain when fish are flushed from Mitchell River.

The same applies for Tambo Bay and Salt Creek near the Tambo River.

Jones Bay is good for pumping bait, and fishes best after heavy rain. Lake Wellington is a large lake with an average depth of only 2.5m.

It is fed by the Avon, Perry and Latrobe Rivers, and at the south-east end drains into Lake Victoria through McLennans Strait.

There is no tidal influence.

On the north shore, Marley Landing, which is 1km west of the Avon River entrance into the lake, gives access to the Avon River mouth, with flathead, whiting and bream.

On the south bank, Bull Bay has a launch site on a track off Seacombe Rd.

A boat ramp is at Seacombe at the top of the strait. The strait has bream and estuary perch, with luderick in autumn. The lake can become rough.

Lake Victoria

Lake Victoria is 25km long and 2.5km wide, with an average depth over 5m.

It has very little tidal influence. Water flows through McLennans Strait if wind or rain changes the lakes’ levels.

Bream, garfish, mullet, luderick, trevally, tailor, flounder and flathead are the main species.

Loch Sport is the access point, reached from Sale or Rosedale on the Princes Hwy, then from Longford via Collier Hill from the South Gippsland Hwy.

There is a jetty and good boat ramp.

Holland’s Landing on the north side of McLennans Strait has a van park. The 9km strait holds most species, including estuary perch.

Jones and Blond Bays are good bream areas.

Flathead and whiting are caught on the channel edges.

Flounder spearing is popular in both lakes.

LaTrobe River has carp, mullet and bream. The river is navigable from Lake Wellington to Sale, via the Thompson River, but is not popular.

Ninety Mile Beach extends from Lakes Entrance to McLoughlins Beach in South Gippsland.

In summer there are snapper, flathead and occasional mulloway.

Elephant fish and gummy sharks bite at night.

Snapper are best in Oct/Nov, but bite all summer.

Winter produces salmon.

Good access, travelling south, is at Paradise Beach, Golden Beach, Delray Beach, Seaspray – from Longford – and Woodside and Reeves Beaches further south.

Fishing near Merrimans Creek mouth near Seaspray during flooding produces mulloway.

Booking.com

Fishing gear for Victorian waters

A 3kg spin outfit is ideal for gar, whiting, mullet, trout, redfin and bream. See eBay listing here.

A 3-6kg spin outfit is ideal for general Victorian saltwater and freshwater fishing. See eBay listing here.

A heavier surf rod is needed for surf mulloway, snapper and gummy shark fishing. See eBay listing here.

This surf rod can be matched with this spinning reel ... eBay listing here.

Metal slice lures are ideal for Victorian salmon, tailor and trevally. See eBay listing here.

Soft plastic grubs are good all-round lures for a range of Victorian species. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Squid jigs are essential gear in Victoria. See eBay listing here.

Star sinkers or snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for surf and boat fishing. For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. See eBay listing here.

Hooks in mixed sizes (suggest 1# or #2 for whiting, 6# or #8 for garfish, 4/0 for salmon and flathead, 11/0 for large mulloway). See eBay listing here.

BOATS FOR SALE in Victoria - see current eBay listings here.

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Email us any corrections, additions, pictures or video here.

Some external videos filmed around Lakes Entrance are featured below.

Lakes Entrance drone footage

Gippsland Lakes artificial reefs

ET at Lakes Entrance

Lakes Entrance flathead

Lakes Entrance surf fishing

Lakes Entrance offshore fishing

Gippsland Lakes bream competition

Loch Sport drone footage

How to catch squid off the beach

Both tropical longfin squid (often called tiger squid) and southern calamari squid often hunt near shore where they can be caught from beaches, jetties and rocks.

Tiger squid will hunt in a few inches of water in the tropics, and the author has caught them in these situations on a fly rod – the proof can be seen here.

Southern calamari squid are found almost anywhere there is a weedbed or broken sandy bottom.

Dusk and dawn are usually the best times for catching southern calamari, but tiger squid will hunt night and day.

Both species prefer clear water.

Arrow squid are more likely to be seen further offshore.

Squid can be taken from shore using standard artificial jigs or baited jigs.

A casting rod with 6kg line is ideal, you might want to use heavier line if fishing from a jetty where you must pull large squid up – the squid will never weigh 6kg but some reserve in the line helps, and you never know when a giant cuttlefish might show.

In southern waters squid are often targeted by using a baited ‘spike jig’ under a float. A small fish is impaled on the jig and cast out under a float.

When using jigs with no barbs on the hooks always keep the line tight after hookup or the jig might detach from the squid.

Squid can be sight-fished in many locations.

To find your squid, patrol likely spots at dawn and dusk, with most locations fishing best at high tide.

Squid are great fun for kids to catch.

Squid are delicious, and being abundant you don’t have to feel guilty about eating them.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

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Squid fishing gear

A 6kg spinning outfit is suitable for squidding. See eBay listing here.

Standard squid jigs such as these work well ... see eBay listing here.

Baited 'spike jigs' are popular in South Australia but will work well on large calamari squid in all southern states - these are cast under a float and left out until a squid takes the bait. Bait these jigs with a small tommy ruff or mullet. The large baited jigs with a set of underlying barbed hooks are very effective even though they look clumsy compared with smaller jigs more commonly seen ... see the eBay listing here.

Squid can be targeted with baited jigs such as these as well ... see eBay listing here.

Don't forget to take a sharp knife and a bucket because squid squirt ink and are a messy catch. Some freezer bags are always handy so you can part-process your squid on location.

Good luck!

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Some external videos featuring landbased squid fishing are featured below.

Squid from the beach

Squid from the beach

Jetty squid

How to clean squid

Kurrimine Beach, Queensland

Kurrimine Beach as shown on a GBRMPA zoning map
Kurrimine Beach as shown on a GBRMPA zoning map

Kurrimine Beach tides
Great Barrier Reef regional zone map
Queensland dam water levels
Queensland stocked impoundment permits
Queensland fishing regulations

Kurrimine Beach is a popular fishing community north of Mission Beach, a 90-minute drive south of Cairns.

There is reef, beach and creek fishing, with some good spots for boaters in close.

Importantly, the GBR reefs are only a relatively short run out compared with other East Coast locations.

Boaters should take note of Green Zone boundaries which lie north and south of the community’s inshore waters.

King Reef is a popular spot that extends out from Murdering Point.

This coastal reef has an annual run of mackerel in the cooler months and produces tropical rock lobsters (painted crays) for divers.

Being close in, King Reef can be fished in small boats in suitable conditions.

Spearfishing is popular as the water here is often clear.

August, September, October is best for the inshore school, spotted and spanish mackerel.

Large spanish mackerel come in close at high tide and can be caught in early mornings or late afternoons around King Reef by trolling or with live or deadbait.

Ellison and Eddy Reefs are the nearest proper GBR reefs, at 30km and 35km from Kurrimine, an easy run in a suitable trailerboat.

Adelaide, Potter and Farquarson reefs lie a little further out, providing plenty of ground to explore.

Fishing the deep rubble or fern ground between the GBR reefs can produce big red emperor and nannygai, while the reefs themselves have coral trout, tusk fish, cod and other reef fish, as well as big mackerel and GTs.

Trevally can be a nuisance, and surprises such as oversize mangrove jacks can be expected.

The beach can be fished at high tide for salmon, bream, flathead, grunter jacks, trevally, queenfish and whiting, however it is heavily tide dependent, with a wide flat exposed at low tide.

Aim to fish a large incoming tide for best results, and use livebait or fresh local bait such as herring or sardines.

Maria Creek produces mud crabs, mangrove jack, blue salmon and occasional barramundi.

Liverpool Creek to the north has good estuary fishing at times, with sooty grunter in the upper freshwater section.

There are two tide-dependent boat ramps at Kurrimine Beach but locals usually launch off the beach with a tractor.

A local highlight is the annual fishing competition, a major event, hosted by Kurrimine Beach Fishing Club.

Nearby Mission Beach has a jetty on Alexander Drive, with mackerel in winter, and excellent offshore fishging.

Nearby Clump Point Boat Harbour has landbased fishing.

South of Mission Beach are the Murray and Hull rivers, with jacks, trevally, barra and mud crabs.

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Booking.com

Fishing gear for Queensland's tropical waters

Much tropical estuary and river fishing involves casting and trolling lures around snags, where a lure desnagger soon pays for itself. The simplest type is dropped on a cord ... see eBay link here.

Or for a true blue Aussie lure desnagger, try this one ... eBay link here.

When targeting barramundi and other large tropical estuary fish a baitcaster combo is the best option. The small overhead reels on these combos allow thumb control when casting, making lure placement easy. However practise is required to cast these reels and they do not cast tiny lures easily. A baitcaster combo loaded with 10kg braid will handle most barramundi and threadfin salmon, with 15kg line better for large dam fish among timber and when trolling big rivers. See a suitable baitcaster listing on eBay here. The listed rod-reel combo can be used for trolling and casting.

Single-handed baitcaster rods are an option for day-long casting sessions, these combos are missing the rod butt's lower section. DO NOT buy a low-quality baitcaster reel as they can be awful to use - if on a tight budget buy a spinning reel instead.

A 6kg spin outfit (eggbeater type reel) is fine for much tropical Queensland estuary and freshwater fishing. Lighter outfits aren't recommended as you may hook big fish in tropical waters. A 6-10kg rod-reel combo is needed for barramundi and threadfin salmon and this can also be used to cast lures to pelagic fish such as mackerel and tuna. A 3kg spin outfit is ideal for whiting, bream and flathead. See eBay listing here.

For boat fishing, a short, powerful rod with overhead or spinning reel loaded with 15kg braided line is ideal for general reef fishing in water to around 25m deep, and can also be used to troll for pelagic fish. See eBay listing here.

Heavier outfits are recommended for deeper water, always using braided line as its thin diameter is less affected by currents.

Soft plastic grubs and shads are good all-round lures for a range of tropical Queensland saltwater and freshwater estuary species. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Bibbed hardbody minnows by quality brands such as Reidys and Classic are generally used for barramundi fishing. Barramundi are strong fish that tear apart the split rings and hooks on cheaply made lures, so buy wisely. Tropical tackle shops are well stocked with these lures.

Squid jigs are useful in tropical Queensland waters. See eBay listing here.

Snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for boat fishing. Heavy leads are needed in deep water because of ocean currents.

For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. Listing on eBay here.

Hooks in mixed sizes (suggest 1# or #2 for whiting, 6# or #8 for garfish, 4/0 for flathead, 11/0 for barramundi, jewfish and reef fish. Listing on eBay here.

Ganged hooks (joined chains of hooks) are used when fishing pilchard or sauri baits for mackerel. Listing on eBay here.

Lastly, Queensland tropical waters have saltwater crocodiles, stonefish, box jellyfish, irukandji jellyfish and ever-present sharks. These can all show up where you don't expect them, including in the shallows around boat ramps and beaches next to tourist resorts. Don't take risks.

BOATS FOR SALE in Brisbane - current eBay listings here.

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Email us any corrections, additions, pictures or video here.

Some external videos filmed around Kurrimine Beach are featured below.

Kurrimine Beach fishing

Boat launching at Kurrimine

Kurrimine fishing competition

Kurrimine Beach drone footage

Tasmania’s best trout waters

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
Tasmanian river flows
Bag and size limits
Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Here’s a list of the better known Tasmanian trout fishing spots, along with why they are great. Tasmania also has many fishing spots that are hidden gems.

South Esk River – this is Tasmania’s longest river and one of the best trout rivers. It begins in the Ben Lomond plateau near Mathinna and runs through Fingal, Avoca, Evandale, Perth Longford and Hadspen. The river merges with the Meander River, and flows through Cataract Gorge to join the North Esk River at Launceston. From this arises the Tamar River, which flows into Bass Strait. The South Esk includes Trevallyn Dam near Launceston, also a fishing hotspot. The river’s two largest tributaries are the Macquarie and Meander Rivers, with lesser tributaries being the Nile River, River Tyne, Storys Creek and the Break O’Day River. This river has everything from fast races to long slow sections, depending where you choose to fish.

Penstock Lagoon – this shallow waterbody has a steady water level which allows insects to thrive. Great for dry and wet fly fishing for browns and rainbows. More info here.

Little Pine Lagoon – this relatively small waterbody is one of Tasmania’s best fly fishing locations. Anglers enjoy sight-fishing for tailing fish and dun feeders from boat and shore.

Great Lake – this huge waterbody has changed historically as the dam was periodically built higher. Brown and rainbow trout can be caught all year. The shores of the lake are quite barren when the water level, with surrounding tracks, making access easy. Great fishing can be had. There are summer beetle falls for dry fly fishing, and a special feature is open water sight fishing for trout cruising wind lanes, the big fish can sometimes be seen in the waves. More info here.

Arthurs Lake – a consistently popular location over the years. It produces big trout and also large numbers of smaller fish. Dry fly fishing is outstanding during insect hatches. Boaters can also fish wind lanes, and there is good streamer wet fly fishing when trout are chasing galaxia. More info here.

Brumbys Creek – this large lowland creek has cold water flowing in from the nearby highlands which ensures it fishes well through summer. There are mayfly hatches in spring, summer and autumn, and dry fly fishing can be outstanding. More info here.

Western lakes – Tasmania’s highlands have a special wilderness fishery with dozens of lakes spread across the Central Plateau, west of Nineteen Lagoons. This area is traversed on foot and great care is required as blizzards can occur. There are not many trout in these shallow and often small waters but many fish encountered are trophies. Landbased sight fishing for brown trout doesn’t get much better.

Huon River – the Huon produced the biggest brown trout caught in Tasmania. It is a tough water though, flowing hard much of the year past banks lined with fallen timber. Summer and autumn sees the river fall and the stone river bed exposed. Spinning and wet fly fishing works. The annual sea trout run below Huonville often produces great fishing when the whitebait is moving. More info here.

Macquarie River – this slow lowland river is famous for hatches of red spinner mayfly. Drift boat fishing with a dry fly is popular, and bankside wading works too.

Nineteen Lagoons – these waters west of Great Lake can be reached via the road to Lake Augusta. This is wilderness fishery but with less walking required than the Western lakes. Try fishing flooded backwaters early in the season, and then sight fishing the shallows later in the year.

Lake Burbury – this large lake is open all year and produces huge numbers of mostly small wild rainbow and brown trout. Many styles of fishing can be employed. More info here.

Mersey River – most rivers in Tasmania have brown trout, but the Mersey has rainbow trout. Brown trout are caught in the lower sections.

Bronte Lagoon – a great place to try your hand at fly fishing. Be on the shores very early and you will likely see fish feeding in the shallows. Nearby Bronte Park has cabin accommodation and there are other lakes nearby, including the Bradys-Binney-Tungatinah chain. Brown, brook and rainbow trout are caught in Bronte.

Clarence Lagoon – the attraction of this small, shallow water is that it contains only brook trout. Catching them though can be tricky, rough weather might improve your chances, but be suitably equipped with warm weather gear. More info here.

Lake Pedder – the lake was famous for its giant trout after it was flooded, but the fish soon grew in number and shrank in size. There is now a huge number of mostly small brown and rainbow trout to be caught. Nearby Lake Gordon also has brown and rainbow trout, and redfin. Pedder has a more stable water level and arguably better fishing around the edges, but Gordon produces some big fish around the drowned timber. Pedder, being a huge impoundment, is worth a visit for the scenery, and there is accommodation near the main boat ramp. More info here.

There are many other fisheries throughout Tasmania, from large lakes to tiny creeks. Annual rainfall affects the rivers and lakes to some extent, and annual fish stocking, research this when planning a trip.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

Booking.com

Fishing gear for Tasmanian waters

Coastal landbased fishing, inshore boat fishing and trout fishing in Tasmania generally requires only light gear.

For chasing freshwater trout and wary sea runners in clear, shallow water, a 1-3kg spin outfit is ideal. See eBay listing here.

There are many lures suitable for chasing trout, but a proven local favourite is the Tassie Devil. See eBay listing here.

Another proven favourite is the Rapala Brown Trout 3cm minnow. See eBay listing here.

Fly fishing combos, complete with rod, reel, tapered leaders, flyline and flies, are available in various sizes. A 3-weight is OK for small rivers while a 6-weight is better for lakes. See eBay listing here.

Combos can offer good value but it may be wise to purchase some tapered leaders from a dedicated line brand such as Maxima, as high quality is important when you are fishing with very light line. See eBay listing here.

It may also be wise to buy an assortment of flies separately that are best suited to Tasmanian fishing.

A 3-6kg spin outfit is popular for general estuary and light boat fishing in Tasmania. See eBay listing here.

The above light outfit can be used on shallow, low-energy beaches to catch cocky salmon and yelloweye mullet, but a dedicated light surf rod is better for this purpose.

A heavier surf rod is needed for surf salmon and gummy shark fishing. See eBay listing here.

This surf rod can be matched with this spinning reel ... eBay listing here.

Small metal slice lures work well on Tasmnania's salmon, silver trevally, flathead and barracoutta. See eBay listing here.

Use larger metal slice lures on high-energy beaches where big salmon are expected.

Soft plastic grubs work well on bream, cocky salmon, escaped Atalantic salmon and freshwater redfin and trout. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Squid jigs are an essential item in Tasmania, as calamari and arrow squid are usually abundant in the warmer months and readily available from jetties. Baited jigs also work well. Standard lure jigs such as these work well ... see eBay listing here.

The secret for successful squid fishing is to fish dusk, darkness and dawn, when the water is clear. Summer is usually best.

Floats are useful for suspending a bait, and work well when fishing for some Tasmanian species. The polystyrene floats in the following listing are slid onto the line and a stopper is placed above the float to set the depth fished. See eBay listing here.

Star sinkers or snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for surf and boat fishing. For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. See eBay listing here.

Hooks in mixed sizes are needed. Suggest 4# to #8 for whiting, mullet and snotties, 10# to #12 for garfish, 1/0 for bream, and 4/0 for salmon and flathead. See eBay listing here.

Flounder spearing is popular in Tasmania. A submerged light is generally used to find the fish, see eBay listing here.

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Check out Parsun outboard motors on eBay

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Some external videos featuring Tasmanian trout are featured below.

Western lakes trout fishing

Trout fishing in Tasmania

Penstock Lagoon, Tasmania

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
Tasmanian river flows
Bag and size limits
Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Penstock Lagoon is a special highland fishery that has stable water levels which allow aquatic life to flourish.

Penstock was built in 1916 as a water storage for the since closed Waddamana power station.

Today the storage is managed as a fishery.

Water levels are usually highest in spring but do not change much through the year.

Penstock has varied habitat, from marshes to rocky shorelines.

Most of the waterway is shallow, around a metre deep, with some timber and rocks.

Fishing is by fly only.

There are no reliable spawning rivers feeding the lagoon so there is little natural recruitment of trout.

This fishery relies on regular stocking, and both brown and rainbow trout are released.

There is a bag limit of two fish and the open season is usually from around August to May.

Penstock is one of the most consistent mayfly waters in the highlands.

Large hatches occur, with duns appearing from November to March. Overcast days are best, and hatches usually peak from about 11am to early afternoon.

Spinners occur at Penstock, with fish feeding on them along the edges of marsh and sometimes well into the lagoon. Calm afternoons are best for spinners.

The small caenid mayfly hatches early, from before dawn to sun-up, from about November to February.

Penstock has plenty of terrestrial insects like gum beetles and jassids that interest trout at times, usually in summer.

The western shore’s marsh sees brown trout in the shallows early, with an evening session also possible.

Springs sees fish chasing frogs in the marsh, with tadpole and nymphs bringing the fish on to December.

Blind casting the rocky shores works when trout are chasing baitfish.

Drifting the lagoon with wet flies also works, but it is the prospect of enjoying the visual styles of fishing that many Penstock anglers enjoy.

The lagoon has a healthy native fish population, with climbing galaxias, spotted galaxias, Great Lake paragalaxias and Shannon paragalaxias present.

Eels are also in the lagoon.

There are two designated camping areas and a boat ramp on the western shore. The maximum period for camping is 14 days.

As the lagoon has an average depth of only a metre a designated 50m wide corridor for petrol-powered boats has been created.

This corridor runs from boating channel at the ramp end of the lagoon to Crisps Point on the east side, down the centre of the lagoon towards Lily Pond at the southern end.

Boats traversing the lagoon must be in the corridor, which is marked by white buoys in the lagoon.

Boating outside of the corridor should be by electric outboard or rowing.

A 5 knot speed limit applies throughout.

Penstock Lagoon’s numbers 1 and 2 canals above two white posts on opposite banks of those canals are closed to fishing.

Fishing from a boat within 100m of a shore angler is prohibited unless the boat is moored.

Freezing conditions can occur quickly, carrying suitable warm weather gear is a must.

Penstock is a unique fishery that is well worth a visit if you are fly fishing tragic.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

Booking.com

Fishing gear for Tasmanian waters

Coastal landbased fishing, inshore boat fishing and trout fishing in Tasmania generally requires only light gear.

For chasing freshwater trout and wary sea runners in clear, shallow water, a 1-3kg spin outfit is ideal. See eBay listing here.

There are many lures suitable for chasing trout, but a proven local favourite is the Tassie Devil. See eBay listing here.

Another proven favourite is the Rapala Brown Trout 3cm minnow. See eBay listing here.

Fly fishing combos, complete with rod, reel, tapered leaders, flyline and flies, are available in various sizes. A 3-weight is OK for small rivers while a 6-weight is better for lakes. See eBay listing here.

Combos can offer good value but it may be wise to purchase some tapered leaders from a dedicated line brand such as Maxima, as high quality is important when you are fishing with very light line. See eBay listing here.

It may also be wise to buy an assortment of flies separately that are best suited to Tasmanian fishing.

A 3-6kg spin outfit is popular for general estuary and light boat fishing in Tasmania. See eBay listing here.

The above light outfit can be used on shallow, low-energy beaches to catch cocky salmon and yelloweye mullet, but a dedicated light surf rod is better for this purpose.

A heavier surf rod is needed for surf salmon and gummy shark fishing. See eBay listing here.

This surf rod can be matched with this spinning reel ... eBay listing here.

Small metal slice lures work well on Tasmnania's salmon, silver trevally, flathead and barracoutta. See eBay listing here.

Use larger metal slice lures on high-energy beaches where big salmon are expected.

Soft plastic grubs work well on bream, cocky salmon, escaped Atalantic salmon and freshwater redfin and trout. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Squid jigs are an essential item in Tasmania, as calamari and arrow squid are usually abundant in the warmer months and readily available from jetties. Baited jigs also work well. Standard lure jigs such as these work well ... see eBay listing here.

The secret for successful squid fishing is to fish dusk, darkness and dawn, when the water is clear. Summer is usually best.

Floats are useful for suspending a bait, and work well when fishing for some Tasmanian species. The polystyrene floats in the following listing are slid onto the line and a stopper is placed above the float to set the depth fished. See eBay listing here.

Star sinkers or snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for surf and boat fishing. For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. See eBay listing here.

Hooks in mixed sizes are needed. Suggest 4# to #8 for whiting, mullet and snotties, 10# to #12 for garfish, 1/0 for bream, and 4/0 for salmon and flathead. See eBay listing here.

Flounder spearing is popular in Tasmania. A submerged light is generally used to find the fish, see eBay listing here.

****
Check out Parsun outboard motors on eBay

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Some external videos featuring Penstock Lagoon are featured below.

Penstock Lagoon fishing

Penstock Lagoon fishing

Penstock Lagoon fishing

Penstock Lagoon campground

Penstock Lagoon snow weather

Mary River, Queensland

Maryborough tides
River Heads tides
QLD fishing regulations
QLD marine parks
GBRMPA marine parks
QLD stocked waters
QLD dam levels
Return to Qld Fishing Map

Queensland’s Mary River marks the barramundi’s southern limit on the East Coast, with regular catches in the river and occasional fish from the labyrinth of channels, flats and tidal creeks that make up the Great Sandy Strait into which the river flows.

The 290km river begins at Booroobin in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. It flows through the towns of Kenilworth, Gympie, Tiaro and Maryborough before emptying into the sea at River Head on the Great Sandy Strait, between the mainland and Fraser Island, 17km south of Hervey Bay township.

The river has 19 tributaries, including Tinana Creek, Munna Creek, Obi Obi Creek, Yabba Creek, Wide Bay Creek, Six Mile Creek, Deep Creek, and Susan River.

There are two impoundments on the river, being Gympie weir and the Mungar barrage, with several dams on tributaries, being Borumba Dam on Yabba Creek, Baroon Pocket Dam on Obi Obi Creek, Six Mile Creek Dam on Six Mile Creek, Cedar Pocket Dam on Deep Creek, weirs Talegalla and Teddington and a barrage on Tinana Creek.

Tidal fishing access for boaters is generally done from Beaver Rocks ramp 11km from the mouth, or River Head at the mouth, which is 35km downstream from Maryborough township.

Barramundi prefer the turbid water of the tidal river rather than the clearer waters of the adjoining Great Sandy Strait, but don’t expect the numbers of barramundi you may find in rivers further north.

There is however a real chance of catching a trophy saltwater barramundi or threadfin salmon in the Mary River.

Though barramundi are present, the main saltwater catch is whiting (summer, tin can and diver species), flathead, southern and pikey bream, tailor, blue and threadfin salmon, mangrove jacks, northern and southern jewfish, perch (which look like a small jewfish), cod, mud and blue swimmer crabs, and prawns.

There are many drying banks in the upper river and fishermen who explore on a falling tide may become landlocked in creeks or stuck on a sandbank, so explore first on a rising tide.

The river between Beaver Rocks and River Head consists of flats and channels that provide plenty of fishing opportunity.

Beaver Rocks, near the ramp at Beaver Rocks Road, is a popular area about 11km upstream of River Head, near the rivers Crab Islands. The rocks are at approx 25 29.718S 152 51.063E. There is a boat ramp 2km downstream from Beaver Rocks.

Beaver Rocks has deep water that fishes well, along with nearby flats around the Crab Islands.

A strong current flows through the channels, especially on the runout tide. Fish the turn or rising tide for best results.

Flathead are found at the mouths of small creeks and gutters, as well as over tidal flats, especially near channels.

Whiting and flathead move over the flats on incoming tides.

Jewfish, bream and cod are found in the deep holes, and tailor chase bait in the deeper areas of the estuary.

On big tides, try fishing for barramundi with lures or livebait at the mouths of the larger draining mud gutters.

Barramundi should be targeted in warm weather. Being large fish with a distinctive shape, barramundi can be located with diligent use of a good sonar unit.

Prawns are best from around January.

Further upstream, a rocky area to watch for is Leslie Rocks at approx 25 30.596S 152 45.928E. More foul ground exists upstream towards Dundathu at approx 25 28.814S 152 44.677E. Look for warning and channel markers.

Mary River freshwater fishing

Good freshwater fishing can be had on the Mary River freshwater right up to around Gympie.

Bass are stocked in the freshwater section of the Mary River, and sooty grunter and saratoga are also caught. Mary River cod are present.

Associated impoundments Lake Borumba and Baroon Pocket dams produce loads of bass. Borumba has bass, Mary River cod and saratoga.

Access points to the Mary River around Gympie include the kayak run from Kidd Bridge to Widgee Crossing. Normanby Bridge to Kidd Bridge or Fisherman’s Pocket is arguably best for fishing.

Also try the river near Six Mile Creek.

Freshwater barramundi can be caught at Lake Lenthall, on the headwaters of the Burrum River just to the north.

Note that the Mary River has saltwater crocodiles throughout.

Also note that Australia’s Northern Territory also has a Mary River, a famous barramundi fishing area.

Outside the Mary River mouth, the Great Sandy Strait includes a vast labyrinth of drying areas and channels with great fishing for whiting, flathead, bream and more.

The channel should be navigated on a rising tide with plenty of spare fuel. Channels are marked through the strait.

Reef fish are caught around most deep lumps and bumps, with the flats and associated channel edges providing mostly flathead, whiting and bream.

Nearby, the east side of Fraser Island is famous for its annual tailor run, with sharks and jewfish also taken.

Hervey Bay’s long Urangan Pier is a very popular landbased spot that produces big fish.

Occasional bonefish and permit occur in this area, with bonefish sometimes caught in deep water off Fraser island’s Rooney Point, but golden trevally and queenfish are the more likely catch for those chasing sportfish in the shallows.

Slatey bream (blackall), pink snapper, coral trout, cod and sweetlip are caught on local reefs.

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Booking.com

Fishing gear for Queensland's tropical waters

Much tropical estuary and river fishing involves casting and trolling lures around snags, where a lure desnagger soon pays for itself. The simplest type is dropped on a cord ... see eBay link here.

Or for a true blue Aussie lure desnagger, try this one ... eBay link here.

When targeting barramundi and other large tropical estuary fish a baitcaster combo is the best option. The small overhead reels on these combos allow thumb control when casting, making lure placement easy. However practise is required to cast these reels and they do not cast tiny lures easily. A baitcaster combo loaded with 10kg braid will handle most barramundi and threadfin salmon, with 15kg line better for large dam fish among timber and when trolling big rivers. See a suitable baitcaster listing on eBay here. The listed rod-reel combo can be used for trolling and casting.

Single-handed baitcaster rods are an option for day-long casting sessions, these combos are missing the rod butt's lower section. DO NOT buy a low-quality baitcaster reel as they can be awful to use - if on a tight budget buy a spinning reel instead.

A 6kg spin outfit (eggbeater type reel) is fine for much tropical Queensland estuary and freshwater fishing. Lighter outfits aren't recommended as you may hook big fish in tropical waters. A 6-10kg rod-reel combo is needed for barramundi and threadfin salmon and this can also be used to cast lures to pelagic fish such as mackerel and tuna. A 3kg spin outfit is ideal for whiting, bream and flathead. See eBay listing here.

For boat fishing, a short, powerful rod with overhead or spinning reel loaded with 15kg braided line is ideal for general reef fishing in water to around 25m deep, and can also be used to troll for pelagic fish. See eBay listing here.

Heavier outfits are recommended for deeper water, always using braided line as its thin diameter is less affected by currents.

Soft plastic grubs and shads are good all-round lures for a range of tropical Queensland saltwater and freshwater estuary species. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Bibbed hardbody minnows by quality brands such as Reidys and Classic are generally used for barramundi fishing. Barramundi are strong fish that tear apart the split rings and hooks on cheaply made lures, so buy wisely. Tropical tackle shops are well stocked with these lures.

Squid jigs are useful in tropical Queensland waters. See eBay listing here.

Snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for boat fishing. Heavy leads are needed in deep water because of ocean currents.

For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. Listing on eBay here.

Hooks in mixed sizes (suggest 1# or #2 for whiting, 6# or #8 for garfish, 4/0 for flathead, 11/0 for barramundi, jewfish and reef fish. Listing on eBay here.

Ganged hooks (joined chains of hooks) are used when fishing pilchard or sauri baits for mackerel. Listing on eBay here.

Lastly, Queensland tropical waters have saltwater crocodiles, stonefish, box jellyfish, irukandji jellyfish and ever-present sharks. These can all show up where you don't expect them, including in the shallows around boat ramps and beaches next to tourist resorts. Don't take risks.

BOATS FOR SALE in Brisbane - current eBay listings here.

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Email corrections, additions, pictures or video here.

Some external videos filmed around Maryborough are featured below.

Mary River fishing

Mary River fishing

Mary River freshwater fishing

Sandy Straits salmon

Urangan Pier fishing

Urangan Pier drone footage

Lake Lenthalls fishing

Borumba Dam fishing

Tasmanian trout waters that are open all year

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
Tasmanian river flows
Bag and size limits
Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Different open seasons apply to trout fishing waters around Tasmania.

Happily, some Tasmanian waters are open to year-round trout fishing, these waters generally have an abundance of trout, or are waters that likely will not be adversely impacted by all-year fishing.

Brown trout waters are usually open from the first Saturday of August to the Sunday nearest April 30.

Rainbow trout waters close later to reflect the species’ different spawning period, with the rainbow season usually from the Saturday nearest October 1 to the Sunday nearest May 31.

Tasmania also has dedicated brook trout waters, such as Clarence Lagoon and Lake Plimsoll. These are usually open during the brown trout season, but have a more restricted bag limit.

Waters open all year are:

*Brushy Lagoon.
*Craigbourne Dam.
*yingina/Great Lake (other than Canal Bay).
*Huon River downstream from the Huonville bridge.
*Lake Barrington.
*Lake Burbury.
*Lake King William.
*Huntsman Lake.
*Meadowbank Lake.
*Lake Pedder.
*Pioneer Lake.
*River Leven downstream from Whisky Creek.
*kanamaluka/River Tamar, downstream from the Lower Charles St Bridge on the North Esk River and West Tamar Road Bridge on the South Esk River.
*River Derwent downstream from the New Norfolk Bridge.

Some Tasmanian trout waters are closed at all times. These are:

*All waters flowing into Lake Crescent excluding that section of the canal connecting lakes Crescent and Sorell below Interlaken Road (C527).
*Dogs Head Creek, Silver Plains Creek and Mountain Creek flowing into Lake Sorell and for a radius of 50 m below where that water flows into Lake Sorell.
*Curries River Reservoir, within a 400 m radius of the dam intake structure.
*Lake Fenton and tributaries.
*Waters flowing into yingina/Great Lake, Lake Leake, Arthurs Lake and Dee Lagoon.
*Waters within a radius of 50m below where that water flows into yingina/Great Lake, Lake Leake, Arthurs Lake and Dee Lagoon.
*Penstock Lagoon Numbers 1 and 2 canals above two white posts on opposite banks of those canals.
*Brushy Rivulet, flowing into Brushy Lagoon.
*Waters flowing into Talbots Lagoon.
*McPartlans Canal between lakes Pedder and Gordon.
*Craigbourne Dam, from the dam wall and associated infrastructure.
*All ponds, raceways and fish culture ponds operated by the IFS, the exception being Plenty River adjacent to the Salmon Ponds which is reserved for anglers with a disability.
*Within 100m of a fish trap maintained by the IFS.

Booking.com

Fishing gear for Tasmanian waters

Coastal landbased fishing, inshore boat fishing and trout fishing in Tasmania generally requires only light gear.

For chasing freshwater trout and wary sea runners in clear, shallow water, a 1-3kg spin outfit is ideal. See eBay listing here.

There are many lures suitable for chasing trout, but a proven local favourite is the Tassie Devil. See eBay listing here.

Another proven favourite is the Rapala Brown Trout 3cm minnow. See eBay listing here.

Fly fishing combos, complete with rod, reel, tapered leaders, flyline and flies, are available in various sizes. A 3-weight is OK for small rivers while a 6-weight is better for lakes. See eBay listing here.

Combos can offer good value but it may be wise to purchase some tapered leaders from a dedicated line brand such as Maxima, as high quality is important when you are fishing with very light line. See eBay listing here.

It may also be wise to buy an assortment of flies separately that are best suited to Tasmanian fishing.

A 3-6kg spin outfit is popular for general estuary and light boat fishing in Tasmania. See eBay listing here.

The above light outfit can be used on shallow, low-energy beaches to catch cocky salmon and yelloweye mullet, but a dedicated light surf rod is better for this purpose.

A heavier surf rod is needed for surf salmon and gummy shark fishing. See eBay listing here.

This surf rod can be matched with this spinning reel ... eBay listing here.

Small metal slice lures work well on Tasmnania's salmon, silver trevally, flathead and barracoutta. See eBay listing here.

Use larger metal slice lures on high-energy beaches where big salmon are expected.

Soft plastic grubs work well on bream, cocky salmon, escaped Atalantic salmon and freshwater redfin and trout. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Squid jigs are an essential item in Tasmania, as calamari and arrow squid are usually abundant in the warmer months and readily available from jetties. Baited jigs also work well. Standard lure jigs such as these work well ... see eBay listing here.

The secret for successful squid fishing is to fish dusk, darkness and dawn, when the water is clear. Summer is usually best.

Floats are useful for suspending a bait, and work well when fishing for some Tasmanian species. The polystyrene floats in the following listing are slid onto the line and a stopper is placed above the float to set the depth fished. See eBay listing here.

Star sinkers or snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for surf and boat fishing. For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. See eBay listing here.

Hooks in mixed sizes are needed. Suggest 4# to #8 for whiting, mullet and snotties, 10# to #12 for garfish, 1/0 for bream, and 4/0 for salmon and flathead. See eBay listing here.

Flounder spearing is popular in Tasmania. A submerged light is generally used to find the fish, see eBay listing here.

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Check out Parsun outboard motors on eBay

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

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Some external trout fishing videos filmed in Tasmania are featured below.

Tasmanian trout fishing

Tasmanian trout fishing

Tasmanian trout fishing

Tasmanian brook trout fishing

Onkaparinga River, South Australia

Onkaparinga River mouth tides
South Port (Onkaparinga mouth) on Beachsafe
SA fishing regulations
SA marine parks
SA stocked dams
SA dam water levels
Murray River fishing spots

NOTE: Special snapper rules apply in South Australia – more info here.

The Onkaparinga River flows to sea at Port Noarlunga, south of Adelaide.

This is one of the most important tidal waters for Adelaide fishermen, after the Port River and West Lakes.

The mouth of the ‘Onk’ is shallow and sandy but plenty of fish make their way through the entrance to go upstream.

Black bream are the common catch in the river, closely followed by juvenile salmon (locally called “salmon trout”) and yellow-eye mullet, with occasional school mulloway.

Despite its metro location, there is every chance of landing a big bream, although small fish are abundant.

The river mouth and nearby beach is best for larger salmon in winter, usually on an incoming tide in the morning or afternoon.

More common are the juvenile salmon, which are caught year round.

Mullet are caught year round in the river, but are best on local beaches in autumn and winter.

Unlike mullet species elsewhere, yellow-eye mullet take meat baits of cockle or mince, but small hooks and light line are a must.

The SLSC Footbridge in the lower section of the river has salmon trout, mullet and bream, with a chance of school mulloway at night in summer, and sand flathead in autumn and winter.

Weatherald Terrace is a good spot to chase bream, mainly in summer, autumn and winter, with mulloway in summer at night.

The Sand Hills area has bream in summer, mullet in spring and summer and salmon trout all year.

Saltfleet Bridge has mulloway in summer at night, which can be caught at low tide.

River Road has mullet in spring and summer and salmon trout year round, on an incoming tide, with mulloway in summer, on an incoming tide, usually at night.

River Road Bend produces mulloway all year on an incoming tide, with bream in spring and summer.

Seaford Line has mulloway all year at low tide, with bream in winter and spring.

Perry’s Bend is a popular area with mulloway in spring, summer, autumn and night. Bream are caught here all year, with salmon trout are caught in winter and spring on an incoming tide.

Other areas in the river not already mentioned can be fished if you don’t mind tackling the mud in a gumboots and/or waders.

A closed season applies for bream from September 1 to November 30 upstream of the South Road Bridge. You can chase mulloway above the bridge all year.

The Old Rail Bridge and South Road Bridge are good spots to fish for bream all year, with mulloway in spring and summer.

The Old Noarlunga upper section of the river is snaggy but full of bream, with a chance of mulloway.

Bream in the Onk respond to fine tackle, with a 2kg to 4kg rod-reel combo being ideal.

Use a tiny running sinker or no sinker at all. Peeled prawns work well as bait, but live tube worms are better.

To get the biggest bream, fish at night.

Salmon trout take a range of baits, while mullet prefer cockle or mince meat. A local quirk among fishos is to mix mince with curry powder.

Mulloway can be caught on 6kg gear. Use livebaits of small mullet or salmon trout at night. Occasionally mulloway are caught in daylight.

Being a small waterway, the Onk is ideal for canoe fishing. It is also a good place to try lure fishing for bream.

The freshwater section of the Onkaparinga River has trout and redfin, but access is difficult and much of the upper river runs through private property.

Booking.com

South Australian fishing seasons and baits

The following advice applies mainly to the two gulfs.

Black bream - All year, best in winter/spring. Use live tube or blood worms, peeled prawn or tiny lures, best dawn and dusk, often at turn of the tide.

Crabs, blue swimmer - Best in summer/autumn. Rake them or use nets baited with fish frames, fish day or night.

Crabs, sand (two-spot) - May to June. Use drop nets baited with fish frames, tide dependent, their presence is usually noted when they start stealing fishing baits.

Flathead - All year. Use baits of bluebait, whitebait, small pilchards, squid, fish strips or lures, they bite all day.

Flounder - All year. Will take tiny baits of peeled prawn, worms or squid at night tide, but the usual method is spearing in the shallows at night.

Garfish - Best in summer/autumn. Use tiny baits of maggots, prawn, cockles presented on a float or just drifted back from boat, or dab at night with a net and light, they bite all day.

Mullet - Strong run of fish in autumn/winter. Use tiny baits of mince meat, seaweed worms or cockles. They bite in daylight, usually in very close along beaches at high tide.

Mulloway - Best in summer but can be caught all year. Use live baits or fresh fish fillets or freshly caught squid. Fish dusk into the night at turn of tide.

Salmon - Best in autumn/winter but they show up all year. Use baits of peeled prawn, bluebait, whitebait, cockles, pilchards or lures. Best at high tide at dusk and dawn.

Snapper - Best in spring/summer. Use baits of squid, pilchards, fish fillets or jigs. Best at dusk and dawn and they come in close after stormy weather.

Snook - Bite all year. Use lures, pilchards or fish strips. They bite well at night under jetty lights.

Squid - Available all year but best in summer. Use artificial jig lures or baited wire jigs. Best at dawn when the water is clear, but also at dusk and night.

Tommy ruffs - All year. Use maggots, peeled prawn, cockles. Best at night.

Whiting, king george - These bite all year but often better in winter, use baits of cockles, peeled prawn or squid on the edge of seagrass beds, they bite all day, often tide dependent.

Whiting, silver - All year. Use tiny baits of cockles, worms or peeled prawns.

Whiting, yellowfin - All year but best in summer. Use fresh or live worms or peeled prawns. Some fishos do OK on tiny lures.

Fishing gear for South Australian waters

A 3kg spin outfit is ideal for gar, whiting, mullet and bream. See eBay listing here.

A 3-6kg spinning outfit is suitable for general estuary and light boat fishing in South Australia. See this eBay listing for a suggested spinning combo here.

The above light outfit can be used on shallow, low-energy beaches to catch SA's yellowfin whiting and yelloweye mullet, but a dedicated light surf rod would be better for this purpose.

A heavier surf rod is needed for surf mulloway, snapper and gummy shark fishing. See eBay listing here.

This surf rod can be matched with this spinning reel ... eBay listing here.

Small metal slice lures work well on South Australia's salmon trout, silver trevally, flathead, barracoutta, tommies and snook. See eBay listing here.

Use larger metal slice lures on high-energy beaches where big salmon are expected.

Soft plastic grubs work well on bream, salmon trout and tommies, and freshwater fish such as yellowbelly, redfin, cod and trout. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Squid jigs are an essential item in South Australia as large squid are usually abundant in gulf waters and are readily available on jetties. Baited jigs are popular in South Australia - these can be cast and left out until a squid arrives. Bait these jigs with a tommy ruff or mullet and set this under a float. If you don't want to use baited jigs, standard lure jigs such as these work well ... see eBay listing here.

The secret for successful squid fishing is to fish dusk, darkness and dawn, when the water is clear. Summer is usually best.

Floats are useful for suspending a bait, and work well when fishing for South Australia's sweep, tommy ruffs, salmon trout and trevally. The polystyrene floats in the following listing are slid onto the line and a stopper is placed above the float to set the depth fished. See eBay listing here.

Star sinkers or snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for surf and boat fishing. For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. See eBay listing here.

Hooks in mixed sizes are needed. Suggest 4# to #8 for whiting, mullet and tommy ruffs, 10# to #12 for garfish, 1/0 for bream, 4/0 for salmon and flathead and 11/0 for large mulloway. See eBay listing here.

Flounder spearing is popular in South Australia. A submerged light is generally used to find the fish, see eBay listing here.

Crabbing is popular in the South Australian shallows, using a crab rake. See eBay listing here.

Check out Parsun outboard motors on eBay

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Email us any corrections, additions, pictures or video here.

Some external videos filmed around the Onkaparinga River are featured below.

Onkaparinga River bream fishing

Onkaparinga River salmon fishing

Onkaparinga River bream fishing

Onkaparinga River bream fishing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAe7JEAxMvM

Onkaparinga mulloway

Onkaparinga redfin

Barron River, Queensland

Cairns tides
Great Barrier Reef regional zone map
Queensland dam water levels
Queensland stocked impoundment permits
Queensland fishing regulations

Barron River is a tidal waterway north of Cairns Airport.

The river has a boat ramp at Stratford, next to the Captain Cook Highway bridge, and also at Machans Beach near the mouth.

Much the same species are caught in the Barron as nearby Trinity Inlet, but the Barron tends to fish better on big tides.

There are several spots on the Barron suitable for landbased fishing, but keep in mind that large crocodiles are present.

The former Kamerunga bridge upstream from the highway is a fishing platform.

Upstream from the old bridge the bottom is rocky, and mainly cod, bream and jacks are caught.

The deep hole at the junction of Redden Creek has barramundi, jewfish, grunter and cod.

Another good spot is the last bend of the river before it enters the sea, and the drop-off along the mouth channel.

The Barron produces some big barramundi for those who put in the time. Large livebaits fished at night work best, but the fish also respond to well-presented lures.

Drop livebaits in deep holes, or near structure. Judicious use of a quality sounder can reveal the presence of single large fish.

Heavy rain can slow fishing down on the Barron

The sandbar at the sea entrance can fish well for queenfish, trevally, flathead and whiting.

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Booking.com

Fishing gear for Queensland's tropical waters

Much tropical estuary and river fishing involves casting and trolling lures around snags, where a lure desnagger soon pays for itself. The simplest type is dropped on a cord ... see eBay link here.

Or for a true blue Aussie lure desnagger, try this one ... eBay link here.

When targeting barramundi and other large tropical estuary fish a baitcaster combo is the best option. The small overhead reels on these combos allow thumb control when casting, making lure placement easy. However practise is required to cast these reels and they do not cast tiny lures easily. A baitcaster combo loaded with 10kg braid will handle most barramundi and threadfin salmon, with 15kg line better for large dam fish among timber and when trolling big rivers. See a suitable baitcaster listing on eBay here. The listed rod-reel combo can be used for trolling and casting.

Single-handed baitcaster rods are an option for day-long casting sessions, these combos are missing the rod butt's lower section. DO NOT buy a low-quality baitcaster reel as they can be awful to use - if on a tight budget buy a spinning reel instead.

A 6kg spin outfit (eggbeater type reel) is fine for much tropical Queensland estuary and freshwater fishing. Lighter outfits aren't recommended as you may hook big fish in tropical waters. A 6-10kg rod-reel combo is needed for barramundi and threadfin salmon and this can also be used to cast lures to pelagic fish such as mackerel and tuna. A 3kg spin outfit is ideal for whiting, bream and flathead. See eBay listing here.

For boat fishing, a short, powerful rod with overhead or spinning reel loaded with 15kg braided line is ideal for general reef fishing in water to around 25m deep, and can also be used to troll for pelagic fish. See eBay listing here.

Heavier outfits are recommended for deeper water, always using braided line as its thin diameter is less affected by currents.

Soft plastic grubs and shads are good all-round lures for a range of tropical Queensland saltwater and freshwater estuary species. See eBay listing here.

Jig heads are needed for unrigged soft plastic lures. See eBay listing here.

Bibbed hardbody minnows by quality brands such as Reidys and Classic are generally used for barramundi fishing. Barramundi are strong fish that tear apart the split rings and hooks on cheaply made lures, so buy wisely. Tropical tackle shops are well stocked with these lures.

Squid jigs are useful in tropical Queensland waters. See eBay listing here.

Snapper leads are generally used on a paternoster rig for boat fishing. Heavy leads are needed in deep water because of ocean currents.

For most other fishing, ball sinkers are used, as part of a running sinker rig. Listing on eBay here.

Hooks in mixed sizes (suggest 1# or #2 for whiting, 6# or #8 for garfish, 4/0 for flathead, 11/0 for barramundi, jewfish and reef fish. Listing on eBay here.

Ganged hooks (joined chains of hooks) are used when fishing pilchard or sauri baits for mackerel. Listing on eBay here.

Lastly, Queensland tropical waters have saltwater crocodiles, stonefish, box jellyfish, irukandji jellyfish and ever-present sharks. These can all show up where you don't expect them, including in the shallows around boat ramps and beaches next to tourist resorts. Don't take risks.

BOATS FOR SALE in Brisbane - current eBay listings here.

****

Email us any corrections, additions, pictures or video here.

Some external videos filmed around Cairns are featured below.

Cairns landbased fishing spots

Cairns drain fishing

Brisbane public fishing platforms

Brisbane tides
QLD fishing regulations
QLD marine parks
Return to QLD fishing map

Brisbane has several public fishing platforms.

Some have wheelchair-friendly access. The Brisbane City Council also has regular fishing workshops for beginners at some locations … see calendar here.

Bald Hills Tinchi Tamba Wetlands 397 Wyampa Road
Bulimba Bulimba Riverside Park 57 Addison Avenue
Hamilton Cameron Rocks Reserve 79 Kingsford Smith Drive
Hamilton Northshore Riverside Park 305 Macarthur Avenue
Karana Downs Kookaburra Park – West 11 Nayla Crescent
Moggill Moggill Ferry Reserve 3882 Moggill Road
Morningside Colmslie Reserve 420 Lytton Road
Nudgee Beach Tuckeroo Park 1553 Nudgee Road
Ransome Chelsea Road Park 439 Chelsea Road
Sandgate Sandgate Foreshores Park 1 Flinders Parade
Tingalpa Carmichael Park 175 Boundary Street