St Helens, Tasmania

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St Helens is arguably Tasmania’s premier saltwater fishing destination.

The town is on Tasmania’s north-east coast, off the Tasman Highway about 160km from Launceston.

This town has an unbeatable combination of sheltered water fishing in Georges Bay, along with offshore deep sea reef and game fishing, and easy landbased fishing.

All commercial fishing and recreational netting was banned inside Georges Bay in 2004.

St Helens’ location on the “warm” east coast adds to its allure for Tasmanian holidaymakers.

There is reasonably safe access to the outside grounds for those with suitable boats and seafaring skills.

Family fishos will find many good spots, including several small jetties, while more serious fishos can stalk the flats and sight-cast fish in crystal clear water.

The main species caught in the bay are black bream, yelloweye mullet, Australian salmon, flathead, leatherjackets, silver and snotty trevally, tailor, jack mackerel, pike, barracoutta, luderick, flounder, garfish, pink snapper, bluethroat wrasse and king george whiting.

Yellowtail kingfish show up in warm weather, and large calamari squid are usually reliable.

Landbased spots to try include St Helens wharf, Beauty Bay jetty, Kirwans Beach jetty, Parkside jetty, Talbot Street, Cunninghams Jetty, Stieglitz Jetty, Akaroa, Burns Bay, Maurouard Beach, Dora Point and Binalong Bay.

The flats at Stockyard Bay provide excellent sight fishing for various species.

Dora Point has a rock area suitable for landbased lure casting that produces big trevally and salmon, with the chance of kingfish.

Flats within Georges Bay have yabbies (nippers) which can be pumped and are superb bait.

The public camping area at the entrance to Georges Bay has good landbased fishing nearby when salmon and tailor are running.

The east coast’s small rivers, including St Helens’ Georges River, while not carrying many trout, are renowned black bream fisheries.

There are also plenty of big bream caught on the bay flats, and finesse lure fishing works well for these in the clear water.

St Helens is perhaps best known among fishermen as Tasmania’s gamefishing centre.

Offshore fishing produces bluefin tuna, albacore, swordfish and mako sharks.

When the warm water of the EAC is running down Australia’s east coast and past Tasmania, anything is possible, with mahi mahi caught as far south as Port Arthur in years past.

Deep sea reef fishing off St Helens produces tiger flathead, striped trumpeter, morwong, blue-eye trevalla, grenadier and gemfish.

St Helens fishing seasons

Summer sees baitfish schools running throughout Georges Bay and Australian salmon, jack mackerel, trevally and tailor are rarely far behind.

Bream are feeding across the flats from January to May. Silver trevally, pink snapper, king george whiting, yellowtail kingfish and squid are also good at this time of year.

Easter until September is a good time for big garfish. Leatherjackets and yelloweye mullet also bite well in winter.

Spring at St Helens sees a run of sea trout chasing the annual whitebait migration.

A north-easterly afternoon sea breeze blows during summer but often drops away near sunset.

Autumn and winter provides calmer but colder conditions, with ultra-clear water.

Georges Bay itself is a Shark Refuge which means no taking of sharks, skate or rays, other than elephant fish.

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St Helens fishing

St Helens bream fishing

St Helens offshore fishing

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Seaforth, Queensland

Seaforth fishing spots - see the text
Seaforth fishing spots – see the text

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Seaforth fishing map

Fishing map key
1. Low-tide channels and edges have barramundi in warm weather, also salmon, whiting and flathead. Use shallow lures and a quiet approach. This is the furthest large creek from the Victor Creek ramp and therefore tends to be usually fished least.
2. Hole at junction has grunter, golden snapper (fingermark) and barramundi. Mud crabs, jacks, bream and grunter in upper reaches.
3. Barramundi and salmon in low-tide channel and on tidal drains proceeding upstream. Whiting, flathead and golden trevally over flats.
4. Prawns on flats from December to April. Good fishing around mangroves in calm weather on a large rising tide.
5. Barramundi and salmon along edges on incoming tide, as for 3.
6. Scattered rockbar, fish near low tide, jacks, cod and barramundi.
7. Deep water trolling along bank produces mixed species, including barramundi. Bait can usually be found just upstream of Victor Creek boat ramp.
8. Most estuary fish and mud crabs found in upper Victor Creek. Fish tidal drains on an outgoing tide in warm weather for barramundi.
9. Queenfish, trevally and salmon around islands. Spotted and doggie mackerel on northern points in season along with mixed reef fish on shallow reefs, especially golden trevally, tuskfish and grass sweetlip (tricky snapper). Reef fish, mackerel, trevally, golden snapper (fingermark) at night and occasional jewfish.
10. Queenfish in tidal rips.
11. Beach fishing around Halliday Bay.
12. Most estuary species inside Seaforth Creek mouth.
13. Mixed fish over shallow reef.

Boat ramps
A. Victor Creek – sealed ramp.
B. Seaforth Creek – sealed ramp.

Seaforth holiday community is adjacent to a large expanse of drying estuary and mangrove-lined tidal creeks.

This area encompasses much of the inshore waters from St Helens south to Cape Hillsborough which were closed to netting in late 2015.

Victor Creek boat ramp is used to access Rabbit and Newry Islands inshore and Goldsmith Islands further out, and the large creek systems immediately to the west.

This area is subject to a significant tidal movement.

Big tides can improve fishing, especially for barramundi and salmon, but some fishos prefer the clearer waters of small neap tides.

Baitfish can usually be found in Victor Creek, and there are yabbie (nipper) beds at low tide near the ramp.

Warm months are best for barramundi, golden snapper (fingermark) and jacks, with pikey bream and queenfish best in the cool season.

Flathead and whiting are usually available.

Creeks further afield tend to offer slightly better fishing, especially for jacks and crabs.

Rocky points around the mainland and islands hold some big barramundi during Sept/Oct, with queenfish, trevally and mackerel during the cooler months.

Big golden snapper are caught on local reefs at night in the summer, usually with livebait.

Fishing in this region usually fires up after a big summer wet season, with average fishing in dry years.

Because the estuaries and coastal waters throughout are shallow and subject to large tides, with many areas drying at low tide, launching and navigating is easier and safer towards high tide.

Many boaters launch at high tide, fish the low and early incoming tide, and return to the ramp on the high.

During large tides it becomes rough when wind and tide are opposed, especially around points.

The water clears during neap tides, with the best lure fishing usually happening immediately after neaps.

Some creeks are suited to tidal locked-in fishing using a dinghy or yak. Walk the holes and cast along the edges where the sand is suitably firm, but keep in mind that the incoming tide can move quickly, so don’t walk too far from your boat.

The tidal flats outside the creeks have flathead, whiting, threadfin and blue salmon, barramundi, golden trevally and bream.

Barramundi are best in warm weather, keeping in mind the Queensland annual closed season.

Cod, sweetlip, tuskfish and coral trout are within range of a 4m tinnie in good weather, with shallow reefs around the islands producing fish.

Mackerel, queenfish and trevally are caught on the inshore reefs and off points by trolling and casting lures.

Golden trevally are often prevalent on inshore reefs in this region, and permit are occasionally caught.

This area produces some huge mud crabs. Crabs are found throughout, with numbers varying from year to year.

During big tides crab pots should be well secured or they will wash away, or at the least the floats will go under.

Nonetheless, big tides can produce crabs, with the action on the early push in.

Prawn runs are usually good in summer, especially during wet summers, and yabbies (nippers) can be collected for bait on many flats.

Collecting yabbies is worth the effort for big whiting, with quality fish taken at night.

There are sealed boat ramps at Murray Creek and Victor Creek.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

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Some external videos filmed around Seaforth are featured below.

Seaforth crabbing

Seaforth fishing

Seaforth doggie macks

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St Helens, Queensland

St Helens fishing spots - see the text
St Helens fishing spots – see the text for map key

St Helens tides
St Helens coastline on Beachsafe
QLD fishing regulations
QLD marine parks
Return to QLD fishing map

St Helens fishing map

Fishing spots
1. Troll for trevally and queenfish.
2. Grunter, golden snapper (fingermark), golden trevally and threadfin salmon.
3. Prawns and baitfish in this area.
4. Grunter, flathead, salmon, barramundi, whiting along mangrove edges and channel edges.
5. Barramundi, salmon, grunter on channel edges, whiting over flats.
6. Barramundi in holes on outside bends, mud crabs throughout.
7. Golden snapper, barramundi, jacks, cod on deep bends throughout.
8. Good creek for mud crabs, grunter, barramundi, jacks.
9. Whiting and flathead on the flats.
10. Whiting, salmon and flathead along beach at high tide, with chance of golden trevally. Grunter and bream around rocks at end of beach.
11. Holes on bends have most species.
12. Good trolling along deep bank for barramundi, jacks, cod. Grunter on livebait.
13. Good trolling and bait fishing along deep bank.
14. Deep hole along bend has most species.
15. Flats edges fish well on big tides for flathead, salmon, golden trevally.
16. Troll deep bank, livebait deep bend for barramundi, cod, jacks – mud crabs throughout.
17. Whiting, flathead, grunter, barramundi along flats edges on rising tide.
18. Jacks along mangrove edge.
19. Good fishing on mangroves on large rising tide, mixed species.
20. Livebait deep areas for mixed species.
21. Fish channel edge.

Boat ramps
A. St Helens, mid-upper tide.
B. Murray Creek boat ramp on Little Bogga Rd. Turn off the Bruce Highway at the Mt Pelion turn-off.

St Helens holiday community is adjacent to a large expanse of drying estuary and mangrove-lined tidal creeks.

This region encompasses a large zone that was closed to commercial netting in 2015.

Boaters can fish several productive creeks, along with endless flats, channels, mangrove edges and nearby islands.

Rocky shorelines can be productive, with big barramundi caught in calm warm weather.

Landbased fishing from the community beach near the picnic area produces mainly bread and butter species on bigger tides, with the chance of large threadfin salmon, queenfish or golden trevally showing up.

Fishing usually fires up after a big summer wet season, with average fishing in dry years.

Anecdotal reports suggest fishing has markedly improved since the net closure.

The area is however challenging to fish.

The estuaries, creeks and coastal waters are shallow and subject to huge tides, leaving extensive drying flats at low tide.

Launching and navigating is easier and safer towards high tide.

Many boaters launch at high tide, fish the low and incoming tide, and return to the ramp on the high.

During larger tides it becomes rough when wind and tide are opposed, especially around points.

The water clears during the smaller neap tides. A good time to fish with lures is just after the dead neaps as the tidal cycle begins to pick up, while the water is still clear.

During bigger tides some creeks are suited to tidal lock-in fishing using a dinghy or yak, leaving the boat and walking the holes and casting along the edges where the sand is firm enough to do so.

The tide can come in fast so don’t walk too far from the boat.

The tidal flats have mostly flathead, whiting, threadfin and blue salmon, barramundi, golden trevally and bream.

In the creeks, work the drains on a falling tide, and the mangrove and channel edges on a rising tide.

Barramundi are best in warm weather, keeping in mind the Queensland annual closed season.

Cod, sweetlip, tuskfish and coral trout are within range of a 4m tinnie in good weather, with shallow reefs around the islands producing fish.

Mackerel, queenfish and trevally are caught on the inshore reefs by trolling and casting.

Golden trevally are often prevalent on inshore reefs and sometimes off the beaches, and permit are occasionally caught.

Mud crabs are found throughout the estuaries, with numbers varying from year to year.

During big tides crab pots should be well secured or they will wash away, or at the least the floats will go under.

Nonetheless, big tides can produce crabs, with the action on the early push in.

Prawn runs are usually good in summer, especially during wet summers, and yabbies (nippers) can be collected for bait on many flats.

Collecting yabbies is worth the effort for big whiting, with quality fish taken at night.

There are sealed boat ramps at Murray Creek and Victor Creek.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

****

Some external videos filmed around St Helens are featured below.

St Helens fishing after the net closure

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Constant Creek, Queensland

Constant Creek fishing spots - see the text
Constant Creek fishing spots – see text for the key

Belmunda tides
QLD fishing regulations
QLD marine parks
Return to QLD fishing map

Constant Creek fishing map

Fishing spots
1. Deep water along the bend of this small creek can hold surprisngly good fish. Use livebait of mullet or herring for barramundi and jacks. Salmon, whiting and flathead are caught along the sandspit at the mouth.
2. Grunter, jacks and barramundi are caught upstream in Nobbler Creek.
3. Whiting, flathead and salmon along the beach at hight itde, best on bigger tides.
4. This small creek has a well defined channel. Worth a look for most local species and mud crabs, try trolling the entrance channel at half tide.
5. Flathead along channel edges. Whiting on a rising tide. Look for salmon feeding over flats on rising tide.
6. One of the better deepwater spots for barramundi, jacks, salmon and grunter.
7. Troll the deep bank.
8. Deep bend, livebait works well for most species, including grunter.
9. Trolling area for most species.
10. Barramundi, jacks, cod and bream on the deep bends.
11. Barramundi and salmon here on a dropping tide.
12. Holes here hold can fish well towards low tide.
13. Good crabbing creek. Be sure to secure pots on bigger tides.

Boat ramps
A – Constant Creek sealed boat ramp.
B – Landing Creek sealed boat ramp.

Belmunda holiday community is located just south of the Cape Hillsborough net-free zone, and has several good creeks nearby, the most popular fishing area being Constant Creek and its associated bay.

Landing Creek and Bobongie Creek are also productive large systems.

Smaller creeks such as Nobbler Creek are worth a look on the biggest tides.

This area is shallow and affected by huge tides, with much of the flats area drying at low tide.

Launching and navigating is easier and safer towards high tide.

Most local fishos launch at high tide, and fish the low and incoming tide, and return to the ramp on the high.

During larger tides it becomes rough when wind and tide are opposed, especially around points.

The water clears during the smaller neap tides. Fish with lures just after dead neaps as the tidal cycle begins to pick up, while the water is still clear.

During bigger tides some areas are suited to tidal lock-in fishing, leaving the boat and walking the holes and channels, casting along the edges where the sand is firm enough to do so.

The tide can come in fast so don’t walk far from the boat.

Fishing fires up after a big summer wet season, with poor fishing in dry years.

The local beaches have flathead, whiting, threadfin and blue salmon, barramundi and bream.

Barramundi are best in warm weather, keeping in mind the Queensland annual closed season.

Deep water in Constant Creek, mainly on its upstream bends, holds barramundi, cod, jacks and grunter.

Fish tidal drains on an outgoing tide for barramundi and salmon.

Salmon and queenfish can be found along channel edges along the flats on a rising tide.

Work mangrove edges with shallow lures as the tide pushes in.

Bird Rock is a lone rock worth a quick troll at high tide for queenfish and trevally.

Cod, sweetlip. tuskfish (bluebone) and coral trout are within range of a 4m tinnie in good weather.

Mackerel, queenfish and trevally are caught on the inshore reefs by trolling and casting.

Mud crabs are usually about, with numbers varying each year. During big tides pots should be well secured or they will wash away, or at the least the floats will go under.

Nonetheless, big tides can produce plenty of crabs, with the action on the early push in.

Prawn runs are usually good in season, and yabbies (nippers) can be collected for bait on many of the flats.

Collecting yabbies is well worth the effort for the biggest whiting, with the really good fish taken at night by dedicated anglers.

There are launch sites at Constant Creek and Landing Creek.

Please email any updates or corrections to fishfindermaps2@gmail.com

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Some external videos filmed around Constant Creek are featured below.

Constant Creek fishing

Belmunda yabby collecting

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Lake Burbury, Tasmania

A state government map of Lake Burbury
A state government map of Lake Burbury

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
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Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Lake Burbury is a large open-all-year impoundment near Tasmania’s West Coast.

Though about 20km long the lake is quite narrow for its length.

In most conditions there are usually places where boaters can fish out of the wind.

The lake has a huge bag limit because of the large number of fish available, which includes browns and rainbows.

The Inland Fisheries Service says it it one of the best angling destinations in Tasmania.

The A10 highway crosses the centre of Lake Burbury where access to the northern camping and launching areas is sign posted.

Access to the camping area and boat ramp at the southern end of Lake Burbury is through Queenstown on the Mt Jukes Road.

All access roads are sealed.

Lake Burbury is managed as a wild fishery.

The many spawning streams entering the lake ensure good natural recruitment, which is why the lake has a large bag limit.

Lake Burbury has great water level fluctuations and can fall dramatically during drought. During this time the shores are accessible to fish, when full landbased fishing is limited.

It is often productive when the weather is overcast or during rains.

Fishos enjoy superb windlane fishing at times.

In the morning a windlane can have many surface-feeding rainbow and brown trout, which usually take wet or dry flies or bait.

Large dry flies can be effective.

Like many of Tasmania western and southern freshwater fishing locations, the lake’s water is a dark tannin colour.

Nonetheless clarity is fine for lure and fly fishing.

An electric motor or drogue helps when windlane fishing.

Trolling around the edges usually finds good fish.

Swimming lures over submerged trees and snags along the shoreline is usually more productive than open-water trolling.

Keep an eye on the sounder and get lures down to the fish.

For bigger fish, cast soft plastic lures where rivers enter the lake, as well as off points, around timber, and over rock drop-offs.

Bounce soft plastic lures along the bottom for best results. A tackle-retriever is essential for inevitable snags.

The lake has a reputation for producing loads of smaller fish, but the bigger fish are there.

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Some external videos featuring Lake Burbury are featured below.

Lake Burbury drone footage

Lake Burbury windlane fishing

Lake Burbury winter fishing

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Brumbys Creek, Tasmania

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Trout fishing spot access programs
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Buy a freshwater fishing licence
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Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
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Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Brumbys Creek provides some of Tasmania’s most consistent stream-based trout fishing.

The creek, located near Cressy, about a 40-minute drive from Launceston, is a lowland tailrace fishery.

The waterflow is controlled by hydro-electricity managers, who release water from Great Lake.

Three weir sections each provide slightly different fishing conditions.

Mainly brown trout are caught, along with some rainbows. There are also Atlantic salmon, tench, eels and redfin.

The state government has negotiated access for fishermen across some of the associated private land.

Where signs are displayed fishermen have free access, but in other locations visitors must ask permission.

Brumbys is a wild trout fishery.

The creek is known for consistent mayfly hatches and visible tailing trout, with excellent sight-fishing when the fish are cruising weedbeds.

There are also fly fishing opportunities tempting dragonfly and caenid feeders, as well as good bait fishing and blind lure-casting.

Calm days are best, as the wind blows hard at times and can make fishing difficult, but do not be put off by rain.

Water quality varies but is usually good.

Because of the relatively steady water level insect hatches are not as substantial as other lowland fisheries but they are consistent through the season.

Warm, humid weather brings on red-spinner duns, with the best hatches in late spring and early summer, usually around dusk.

Smaller hatches continue through January and February.

The best dry fly fishing is usually on warm days at dusk.

Tailers run from August to January, and are arguably best in the top weir pondage in mornings and afternoons, and on overcast days.

Lure fishos usually do well on sunny days when the water is clear, casting the channel between the first and second weirs.

Bigger trout are often found in deeper water.

After heavy rain the creek can fish well down to its junction with the Macquarie. In these conditions fish run-offs and submerged shores.

There is not much timber in the creek so light tackle can be used.

Worms and wattle grubs work well for bait fishing, and casting unweighted drifting baits while on the move is the best way to find fish.

The weirs

The three weirs were built on Brumbys Creek in the 1960s to smooth flows from Poatina power station.

Above Weir 1 the creek is wide and shallow with some channels, with shallow shorelines, weed and some timber.

Weed growth here thickens throughout as summer progresses.

Access to this section is via Fisheries Lane, an unsealed road. Launching facilities are suited only to cartopper dinghies, inflatables and yaks.

Lure fishing current lines and dry fly fishing the east shore above the weir works well from a boat.

Weir 1 provides arguably the best fly fishing, with its relatively clear shoreline and weedy margins where fish feed early in the season, or when the weather warms.

Bait fishing is prohibited above the first weir.

Below Weir 1 is a wide area of shallow water with a mostly mud and weed bottom.

Soft plastics and surface lures can be fished here but weed can make lure fishing hard.

Trout congregate where the channel drops and this area can be fished all the way to the second weir.

Cast over the edge of flats and work lures down the channel drop offs.

Access along this stretch is limited by undergrowth.

The water widens as it approaches the second weir.

The road leads all the way to the second weir and from there are access signs.

Waders are useful when fishing the first and second weir sections.

Fishing from a boat is prohibited between the first and second weir.

The fast water below the second weir produces fish and is easily reached from the road.

Clear banks make easy fishing here almost all the way to the bottom weir.

Most fish in this section are smaller but the easy access makes it a popular area.

Much of the river below the second weir flows over shallow weed and can therefore be difficult to fish with lures.

There is good fly fishing along this section.

Below the third weir the creek eventually flows into the Macquarie River.

The banks are easily fished for a long section.

The fast water directly below the weir sometimes has escaped rainbow trout from a local fish farm.

The river between the third weir and Macquarie River has a main channel and weed growth. Fishing from a boat here is prohibited.

Strict boating rules apply at Brumbys, with different rules in each weir section.

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Some external videos featuring Brumbys Creek are featured below.

Brumbys Creek drone footage

Brumbys Creek drone footage – weir 2

Brumbys Creek fly fishing

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Great Lake, Tasmania

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
Tasmanian river flows
Bag and size limits
Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Great Lake, on Tasmania’s Central Plateau, was one of Australia’s largest lakes even before the first dam was built in 1916.

A second larger dam was built in 1922, and again in 1967, and in 1982, the dam was raised.

Raising the water levels did not improve fishing however, as many of the original shallow weedbeds were destroyed.

This relatively shallow lake now covers almost 18,000 hectares when full.

It is managed for hydro-electricity generation.

The lake is fed by the Ouse River in the west and from Arthurs Lake in the east.

Augusta Dam stores the headwaters of the Ouse River, and the outflow is transported to Great Lake by Liawenee Canal.

Water from the lake flows down a tunnel beneath the Great Western Tiers, and into Tasmania’s second largest power station at Poatina.

Great Lake became a premium trout fishery shortly after it was first stocked in 1870, and soon produced trophy fish.

Today it produces mixed bags of brown and rainbow trout. The browns are naturally spawned and the rainbows are stocked.

The fish usually run to about 1.5kg, with rainbows making about 10 per cent of the catch.

Most fishing methods are permitted, except at Tods Corner and Canal Bay, which are for lures only.

At first glance the lake appears as a moonscape to newbies, especially when the water level is low, as the shoreline is mostly just a shallow gradient of rocky rubble.

Don’t be put off.

Landbased fishos can do very well. Bait fishing with mudeyes, crickets and worms is productive.

For bait fishing, find a shoreline that the wind is blowing onto.

In calm weather the water is very clear, and sight-fishing works well.

Blind-casting lures along a choppy, stirred up shoreline can also produce good fish.

In summer there are insect hatches and beetle falls, usually best from December to February, with associated good dry fly fishing.

Try fishing the lee of points, with Tods Corner being a prime area.

For boaters, trolling deep diving lures, or using downriggers or leadcore lines to get lures down, works well.

Get lures down deep enough to swim just above weedbeds.

Trolling is particularly good in the south-western area, including Swan Bay.

Windlane fishing is a prime sport for boaters.

Midge pupae hit the surface when the wind drops in the evenings and this continues into the night and morning.

There can be constant visible surface activity.

Land insects are mixed up with the midges and this means the fish often take large flies and not just tiny midge patterns.

Wind lanes are where the midge rafts and land insects gather, and the fish follow the most dense food sources. As well as wind lanes, try fishing foam lines.

Sometimes there are rafts of midges on the water and large groups of fish feeding.

Gum beetle falls happen during the warm days in summer and can bring on good fishing in hot weather.

Around wind lanes, the fish can often be sight-cast, just look for any sign of activity.

In windy weather fish are often visible in waves.

Northerly winds create waves that travel south, which makes it easy to see fish in the back of the waves when the sun is behind the angler.

When beetles and midges aren’t out in the lake, fish the shorelines.

Shorelines that have silt or weed bottoms, and with the wind blowing onto them, are ideal.

Four native fish species are present in the lake, including Great Lake paragalaxias and Shannon paragalaxias, both being threatened species.

The others, being spotted and clombing galaxias, are widespread in Tasmania.

The lake has five species of shrimp, and native Charophyte weedbeds.

The lake falls to low levels after periods of poor rainfall.

A low level boat ramp allows boating in these conditions.

Current lake water levels are available at https://www.hydro.com.au/water/lake-levels

The lake is considered a unique aquatic environment that requires special protection.

Anglers should bring portable toilets or walk 100m or more from the waterline, and dig at least a 15cm hole to bury toilet waste.

No fires are permitted on the foreshore of Great Lake.

Formal camping and caravanning is at Miena.

Other campsites are at nearby Jonah Bay and Pump House Bay at Arthurs Lake, and at Penstock and Little Pine Lagoons.

There are launch sites at Swan Bay, Cramps Bay, Brandum Bay, Tods Corner and Haddens Bay.

These ramps are serviceable between full and 17m below full.

A gravel low level launching area is at Boundary Bay on the western shore, south of Liawenee.

There is a silted bay at the north end of Renolds Neck which can fish well when waves are hitting the shore.

Canal Bay has some shallow weed and is a good spot to fish.

Great Lake experiences extreme weather and can become rough without warning.

At low water it is shallow and has many submerged navigation hazards.

Great Lake fishing spots summary

The northern part of the lake is open and gets rough in westerlies. Northerlies are best for fly fishing here, although trolling is the most popular method in the open water.

Smaller bays in the northern end such as Little Lake Bay, Cramps Bay and Canal Bay are ideal for wading. Flycasters can sight-fish stick caddis feeders – try using a generic dry fly and if that doesn’t work use a stick caddis imitation.

In rough weather try the rocky shores where the wind is blowing in and use sufficiently heavy lures that can be cast into the wind.

The southern send of the lake has a more varied shore and is also near the Great Lake Hotel. The south produces fewer fish than the north but they are often bigger, possibly because there is more weed in the southern section.

The west section from One Tree Point to the Beehives has good access if you have a 4WD. Try the Kangaroo Islands, Beehives, Tods Corner, Swan Bay and McClanaghans Island.

Tods Corner receives water from Arthurs Lake and this seems to supercharge the fishing, as there is more weed here than other bays. The boat ramp also makes it popular.

The two Kangaroo Islands in the middle of the lake have adjacent weedbeds, with good windlanes during strong northerlies. Look for foam lines that come off the islands. Bigger fish are caught here, including many rainbows.

The Beehives is a peninsula that sticks out towards McClanaghans Island. In a northerly there is usually a windlane that fishes well. Lure fishing from shore works. A 4WD track from the highway north of the hotel goes to the point. A drop-off extends down to 6m deep and produces plenty of rainbows.

Swan Bay near Miena has extensive weedbeds. Expect midge hatches in the morning and evening here during calm spells.

McClanaghans Island has rocky patches that fish well. Try the east side between the island and point, where shrimps congregate and produce some very fat fish.

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Some external videos featuring Great Lake are featured below.

Great Lake drone footage

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ODBfZuLeW4

Great lake browns and rainbow trout

Great Lake rainbow trout

Great Lake fishing landbased with soft plastics

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Arthurs Lake, Tasmania

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
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Tasmanian river flows
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Arthurs Lake is arguably Tasmania’s best stillwater trout fishery.

The lake is about an hour by road from Launceston and 90 minutes from Hobart, and is open to bait, lure and fly fishing.

An annual open/closed season applies.

The impoundment’s water is used for hydro electricity, with water pumped into Great Lake to feed Poatina power station.

The lake level varies by only a couple of metres so the four boat launch sites are usually serviceable, but navigation hazards are more numerous at low water.

Fish to 2kg are caught, along with some much bigger fish, but most are up to 1kg.

The brown trout population is maintained by natural recruitment, with spawning monitored each year.

The condition of fish is usually high.

Angler surveys for the past 20 years have shown the fishery produces about two fish per angler per day, but skilled fishos can usually better that.

Before the dam was built in 1965 the lake was two lakes, and adjacent Morass Marsh.

The east side of the lake, known as the “Sand Lake”, is a popular spot for trolling.

The west side is known as “Blue Lake”.

Bait fishing from shore with worms, mudeyes and wattle grubs works well.

Casting soft plastic lures from shore also works.

For boaters, trolling and casting lures around the Morass area’s timber is usually productive.

Early in the season use deeper lures, or leadcore line or downriggers.

Fly fishing is usually best at the north end at Hydro Bay, Cowpaddock Bay, Jonah Bay and Fleming Bay.

Cowpaddock Bay is arguably the best spot for shore-based fly fishing during the mayfly season from November to February.

Dun hatches occur in summer alongside gum beetle and ant falls.

Fly-fishers can also sight-fish cruisers and galaxia feeders.

If fish aren’t surface feeding then use wet fly, lures or bait.

There are many good fishing spots accessible from shore, with roads along most of the lake’s western and southern shore.

Arthurs Lake has camping areas at Jonah Bay and Pumphouse Bay.

The lake contains the native saddled galaxias and Arthurs paragalaxias.

Both species are protected.

There are boat launch sites at Jonah Bay, Pumphouse Bay, Arthurs Dam and the western end of Morass Bay at Yangeena.

Public camping areas are located at Pumphouse Bay and Jonah Bay, fees apply.

The lake is exposed to all winds and gets rough with little warning.

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Some external videos featuring Arthurs Lake are featured below.

Arthurs Lake spawning run

Arthurs Lake – Jonah Bay

Arthurs Lake yak fishing

Arthurs Lake camping

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Huon River, Tasmania

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Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
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Huon River regulations
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The Huon is Tasmania’s fifth longest river, at 174km, flowing from Lake Pedder and emptying into the D’Entrecasteaux Channel south of Hobart.

Though this large river produced Tasmania’s biggest single trout, much of the river is difficult to fish, with the deep pools and rapids running through nearly inpenetrable forest.

The upper Huon often flows hard, and is chock full of logs.

The bigger fish tend to hide under submerged timber during daylight hours.

Aside from hatchery escapes, the river is stocked by natural recruitment of trout.

There are hatcheries on the tributaries Little Denison River and Russell River, which explains the occasional brook trout being caught, but for the most part the river is a brown trout and Atlantic salmon fishery, with occasional rainbows.

The tidal section below Huonville’s town bridge is wide and slow moving, and the most easily accessible area.

From Huonville downstream to Franklin there are deep sections mixed with areas of shallow gravel bottom, with snags and drying mudflats that present a navigation hazard at low water.

The largest mudflats are around the Egg Islands, which start more or less opposite Franklin, extending some way downstream.

The tidal reach up to Ranelagh has large resident and sea-run brown trout, as well Atlantic salmon that escape from the fish farm pens downstream and hatcheries upstream.

Bream are also caught in this section, moving well above the Huonville bridge in summer during periods of low rainfall.

Cocky salmon, barracoutta, cod, flathead and tailor are caught in the tidal water below the bridge.

There is good access to the riverbank at Huonville, Franklin and Port Huon and in places between these townships, with the road following the river most of the way.

There is also good access along the adjacent western shore.

The Huon is best known for its sea-run and resident whitebait feeders, caught from late winter into spring. Some of these are very large fish.

They can be targeted with lure or fly from shore and boat.

A boat makes it easier to find the bait congregations and fish.

The whitebait run comprises a mass migration of juvenile galaxia, Tasmanian smelt and Tasmanian whitebait, along with other migrations of juvenile eels and lamprey.

In late winter, spring and early summer look for bust-ups along the river bank eddies, and off points and shallows.

Bubbles on the surface give away where a trout has recently slashed at bait.

The action is usually towards the top of the tide.

The area immediately next to below Huonville bridge is a prime spot for sea runners but for some reason its popularity is not what it used to be, with fishermen historically lined up on the bridge at night in years past.

The freshwater section between Huonville and Judbury has mostly heavily timbered banks with reasonably deep water intersected by riffles and rapids.

There are some signposted public access points.

The Huon River usually runs too high to wade, flowing low and slow only for short periods during summer.

When it does drop low enough to expose the gravel and rock riverbed, access along the riverbank becomes much easier.

The Huon’s abundance of submerged timber means big fish tend to lurk in the crevices during the day, and are usually only caught by using livebait at night.

Soft plastic lures sunk down among logs in daylight will get big fish but expect to get snagged.

The upper section of the Huon between Judbury and Tahune runs through dense forest and is mostly inaccessible unless you have a 4WD vehicle or offroad motorcycle, and are prepared to walk, otherwise the river crossings provide the only access, unless you fish from a kayak or inflatable.

If you have someone to drop you off and pick you up later somewhere downstream, you can launch a yak or inflatable from Southwood crossing and drift downstream. This trip is not technically too difficult or dangerous if the river is low and the current is not running hard, but it is of course much safer to such trips in pairs.

Above the Picton River the Huon runs through thick forest, with the only access being the Huon walking track which goes into the Southwest National Park above Manuka Creek.

The Huon contains freshwater blackfish, which were translocated from the state’s northern waters.

Redfin may be present, as they are abundant in Lake Gordon and probably also exist in the associated Lake Pedder, however redfin have not been formally recorded in the Huon.

Unlike the Derwent estuary, the Huon estuary is considered largely free of pollution that might make fish unsafe to eat. There is legacy pollution in sediment around Hospital Bay at Port Huon, and it may be best to avoid eating bream from this area, but as far as this writer is aware there have been no official warnings.

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Some external videos featuring Huon River are featured below.

Huon River fishing

Kayaking the Huon River

Tailor in the upper Huon

Huon and tributaries

Huon River drone footage

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Arthur River, Tasmania

Tasmanian fishing regulations
Tasmanian marine reserves
Tasmanian saltwater fishing seasons
Trout fishing spot access programs
Fisheries assessment reports
Buy a freshwater fishing licence
Tasmanian lake levels (hydro)
Tasmanian lake levels (govt)
Tasmanian lake webcams
Tasmanian river flows
Bag and size limits
Private Tasmanian trout fisheries
Return to the Tasmanian Fishing Map

Arthur River is a wild waterway on Tasmania’s north-west coast, with trophy sea-run and resident brown trout.

The river has no dams and has good seasonal runs of whitebait, with large sea runners from October.

Many trout over 10kg have been caught in the lower section, but the fishing is not easy.

The water is tannin-coloured and the riverbanks have thick vegetation, which severely limits land-based access.

Shore fishing limited to the river mouth near the road bridge.

Boat fishing, usually trolling minnows of 12cm to 15cm in length, tends to produce the trophy trout.

It is necessary to use gear that can land big fish, without scaring the fish with overly heavy leaders.

The Arthur River is navigable to 18km upstream from the mouth.

Trolling in the upper section produces resident trout to 5kg.

From October the whitebait run brings on the sea runners, and the largest resident trout also come out of the woodwork.

The river also contains estuary perch, which are protected.

In the lower section of the river, the other sportfish is Australian salmon, which start running around November and stay until March to May, depending on rain.

A beach on the north side of the river has relatively safe shore-based salmon fishing.

Vehicles can reach the beach by turning just before the bridge. The sand is usually hard enough for easy 4WD negotiation.

There is a boat ramp on the southern side of the river, take a left turn over the bridge.

The inner Arthur estuary is fishable in small boats, but the bar region is dangerous.

Large saltwater salmon can be caught at Arthurs Beach, Browns Hole, Sandy Cape, Sandy Cape Beach, Netley Bay and Sinking Rock.

These surf spots are best fished in light seas, with easterly weather being best.

At Sinking Rock expect to also catch yellowtail kingfish and silver trevally.

The area south of the Arthur River is managed by the Parks and Wildlife. A caravan park is available at the township.

Arthur River township is 292km from Launceston on the Bass Highway, about a two-hour drive from Burnie.

The long distance from populated areas prevents this area from being fished hard.

Consider releasing the larger trout after taking a quick photo, they are a rare sporting resource.

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Some external videos featuring Arthur River are featured below.

Arthur River fishing

Arthur River fishing

Arthur River camping

Arthur River kayaking

Arthur River camping

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